Buy one get one free with code BOGOMOE

3 Tips for Your Dog's Social Stressors

Some dogs have trouble staying calm in public spaces due to energy levels, inadequate socialization, or experiences, but there are ways to promote more calm, leveled off energy levels in your pup.

Most people think of dogs as friendly, social creatures. Sadly, some dogs don't care to meet other people or even other dogs at all. They may put their tails down, try to hide, or even act aggressively. Here's the great news. You may be able to aid in teaching your dog to have a calmer demeanor with the right upbringing, gentle training, and in some cases, natural supplements.

Three tips that may help your pup be less tense

Does your dog have their guard up, especially when introduced to new people and pets? These tips may help to reduce the chance of a dog behaving badly in front of company.

Early pet socialization

Dogs aren't necessarily born with great social skills. Ideally, dogs will spend the first several weeks of their lives with parents and siblings. During this time, they learn boundaries and dog-talk skills that will serve them well the rest of their lives. Pet parents should build on this effort by introducing their pet to others at dog parks or in the home. 

Of course, even well socialized puppies may develop scared or hesitant tendencies later. This generally happens because of a poor experience or even an illness or aging. Still, good socialization as a puppy greatly encourages the development of well-adjusted adult dogs.

Dog desensitization and behavior training

All pet owners should teach their dog a basic focus command. In other words, the dog should learn to stop whatever he's doing and pay attention to the person who gives the command. At least, that training can help curb all kinds of undesirable behavior.

The American Kennel Club also promotes the idea of desensitizing dogs by slowly introducing them into high-intensity scenarios. For example, under controlled conditions, bring in a new person or dog for just a few minutes. Over time, the dog should get used to the idea of meeting new friends. As always, firmly but kindly stop bad behaviors and reward good ones.

Reward your pup with calming bites

Calming Bites for dogs contain a lot of the same natural supplements that people may take to cope with stressful situations. For some examples:

  • Natural hemp powder: Plenty of tests on people have demonstrated that natural and legal CBD may help maintain a calmer demeanor, and many pet owners say it helps their dogs, too.
  • Chamomile: This herbal remedy can help promote calm while also serving as a powerful anti-inflammatory and muscle-relaxing medicine.
  • Vitamin B1: This vitamin may help improve a dog's ability to react to stressful situations. You might also see vitamin B1 referred to as thiamine.

Why offer your pet Calming Bites for Dogs?

You may recognize the supplements mentioned above because they've grown quite popular with people, too. At the same time, you should give Calming Bites for dogs to your pet because they're made without ingredients that might agree with people and not canines.

Also, it's easier to calculate the best dose by weight when you offer pet-friendly treats. You should expect to need a larger dose for your 80-pound Labrador retriever than your 18-pound terrier. Most vets advise beginning with a smaller dose and then working up to find the optimum quantity. You can find instructions on the label or contact your vet for advice.

Of course, dogs find these calming treats very tasty. That makes it easier to ensure your dog takes his medicine. While your pet thinks he's getting a reward for being a good dog, you can offer a supplement that encourages positive behavior.

Related Products

Every pet owner wants their dog to feel safe, secure, and confident in social situations. If your Moe has a bit of social anxiety, we might be able to help! Our Chillout Bites are formulated to support a calm nature in your dog, and in the most fun way possible - bite sized, all natural goodness!

 

Sources:

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/treating-dog-anxiety/




Previous Article Next Article